The NHS has started delivering Covid-19 booster jabs to people in eligible groups.

The NHS has started delivering Covid-19 booster jabs to people in eligible groups.

Following the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation’s (JCVI) decision on providing booster jabs, the NHS has begun rolling out the Covid-19 vaccination to more people three months after their second dose. With increasing levels of social mixing and close social contact, the booster dose will help to ensure those at higher risk from coronavirus have enough protection going into winter.

Who is eligible for a booster jab?

Please reference the NHS Website to find out whether you are eligible for a booster jab.

The priority groups include people who are:

  • 18 and over
  • live and work in care homes
  • frontline health and social care workers
  • aged 16 and over with a health condition that puts them at high risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19
  • aged 16 and over who are a main carer for someone at high risk from COVID-19
  • aged 16 and over who live with someone who is more likely to get infections (such as someone who has HIV, has had a transplant or is having certain treatments for cancer, lupus or rheumatoid arthritis)
  • People who are pregnant can also get a booster dose.

How to book your booster jab

If you're eligible, you'll be offered a booster dose at least three months after the date of your second dose. You might get a call or text from your GP or receive an invitation to book online by the National Booking Service

When to book your booster jab

If you’re aged 18 or over, aged 16 and over with a health condition that puts you at high risk from Covid-19, or a frontline health or social care worker, you can book a booster vaccine online without an invitation, two months after your second dose.

Book a booster jab via the National COVID-19 vaccination booking service

You can also get your booster vaccination by going to a walk-in COVID-19 vaccination site if you had your second dose at least three months ago and you are:

  • aged 18 and over
  • aged 16 and over with a health condition that puts you at high risk from COVID-19 – you’ll need to bring your letter inviting you to get your booster dose or a letter from your doctor about your health condition
  • a frontline health or social care worker – you’ll need to bring proof of your employment such as your workplace photo ID, a letter or a payslip from your employer within the last three months

If you do not get a letter but you have a health condition and you think you’re eligible, contact your GP surgery.

Find a walk-in COVID-19 vaccination centre

Some of those in the original nine priority groups will not be eligible for the booster until the New Year, and if you are eligible for a flu vaccine, it’s important you get this as soon as possible and not wait to get both at the same time.

However, if you are offered both a flu vaccine and a Covid booster vaccine at the same time, it is safe to have them done together.

The booster programme is being delivered through existing vaccination sites including pharmacies, hospital hubs, GP practices and vaccine centres.

At present, it is not known whether recurrent boosters will be required in the long term.

Which Covid vaccine will I get?

Most people are being offered a booster dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine or Moderna vaccine.

This means that your booster vaccine might differ from the vaccines you had for your first and second doses.

Some people will be offered a booster dose of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine if they cannot have the Moderna or Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine .

Third dose of the vaccine

If you have had a third dose of the vaccine, you can get a booster dose from three months after your third dose. You'll usually be offered a third dose at least eight weeks after you had your second dose, although your doctor may suggest a different timing depending on ongoing or planned treatment.

A third dose of Covid vaccine is being offered to all those aged 12 or over who had a weakened immune system when they had their first two doses.

This includes people who have:

  • a blood cancer (such as leukaemia or lymphoma)
  • a weakened immune system due to a treatment (such as steroid medicine, biological therapy, chemotherapy or radiotherapy)
  • an organ or bone marrow transplant
  • a condition that means you have a very high risk of getting infections
  • a condition or treatment your specialist advises makes you eligible for a 3rd dose

If you're eligible, your GP or hospital consultant should contact you to let you know you can get a third dose. Alternatively, you may get a letter from the NHS advising you that you may be eligible. You should discuss this with your doctor and can usually get vaccinated at a local hospital or GP surgery.

If you're aged 18 or over and have a letter from a GP or hospital consultant confirming you're eligible for a third dose, you can also:

Children and young people aged 12 to 17 can get a third dose at a walk-in vaccination site if:

  • it's been 8 weeks since their second dose
  • they have a letter from a GP or hospital consultant confirming they're eligible



Page last reviewed: 15 December, 2021